You must create a Free Account
in order to STREAM or DOWNLOAD this video
The Young Messiah

The Young Messiah

Before he was the savior, he was a child.Mar. 10, 2016 USA120 Min.PG
Your rating: 0
8.7 1,014 votes

Video trailer

Director

Cast

Synopsis

Tells the story of Jesus Christ at age seven as he and his family depart Egypt to return home to Nazareth. Told from his childhood perspective, it follows young Jesus as he grows into his religious identity.

The Young Messiah
The Young Messiah
The Young Messiah
The Young Messiah
The Young Messiah
The Young Messiah
The Young Messiah
The Young Messiah
The Young Messiah
Original titleThe Young Messiah
IMDb Rating5.5 2,318 votes
TMDb Rating6.3 27 votes

(35) comments

  • geeandreaMarch 11, 2016Reply

    Incredibly thought provoking- what was Jesus like growing up?

    This movie was fascinating. Too often, as Christians, we feel like it
    is wrong to imagine what Jesus was like before the Bible and history
    books mention him. Non-Christians sometimes equate Jesus conflict and
    any discussion or mention of the name is discouraged. This movie did a
    beautiful job of making such an interesting topic approachable. Jesus
    was a baby, a kid, and a teenager, like all of us. It is good the ask
    questions. While this movie takes creative license with details about
    Jesus (because nobody was actually there- nobody knows,) it still
    serves to provoke thought and imagination. This movie is interesting
    and entertaining, whether you are a Cheistian or not. It is not a
    documentary, and there are definitely things that were added and
    omitted this is for entertainment, not to convince people of anything.
    If you are looking for absolute historic, Biblical and ethnic accuracy,
    then please explore this topic through other avenues. The setting is
    breathtaking, and this is overall a very beautiful film.

  • stevestricklandMarch 11, 2016Reply

    Great picture to stimulate conversation

    The movie was and is sure to irritate the non-Christian or
    non-believer. For the irritated, actually watch the movie then, if you
    would, read the Bible about this period. If you watched the film, the
    biggest critic of Christ was Satan himself. Note that Satan tried his
    utmost to cause Christ to faultier. He couldn’t do it. Even to a 7 year
    old. Satan believes in God. Satan is an enemy and even the 7 year old
    Jesus knew this. Negative statements were also used against Jesus. But
    Jesus went to the cross for ALL mankind. Even His critics. This film
    shows the endurance of Christ. How many of those critical even went to
    the movie?

  • suegriseMarch 11, 2016Reply

    Jesus has no clue he’s the Son of God.

    Be informed! The Young Messiah’s high production quality probably makes
    its content more disturbing, because many people will see it and form a
    concept of Jesus from it. Like The Da Vinci Code, the film—based on a
    novel by Anne Rice (Interview With the Vampire)—is loosely based on
    Gnostic texts widely deemed heretical. (In those texts, the boy Jesus
    strikes a playmate dead and then resurrects him, makes clay birds
    alive, etc.) The story’s main premise is that young Jesus has no clue
    he’s the Son of God. As in the Harry Potter saga, the young hero
    gradually discovers his supernatural powers and struggles to control
    them and to discover his destiny. Yet it’s being billed as a
    ”Christian-themed” Easter film and even being supported by some big
    ministry groups. Mary and Joseph try to protect Jesus from the backlash
    from his accidental miracles. In a totally fictional suspense subplot,
    Herod discovers Jesus’ name, age, home, and family and sends a Roman
    soldier to track and kill him. Don’t be bamboozled—read the Bible for
    yourself.

  • bkrauser-81-311064March 13, 2016Reply

    Benignly Boring

    Out of all the reviews I have written thus far, this one may arguably
    be the toughest. Not because Young Messiah is a particularly good
    movie; it’s not. I struggle because while it might be easy to lampoon a
    movie for being amateurish, inept, casually racist, remarkably
    insincere, thematically dubious and egregiously pandering; this movie’s
    greatest sin however is it’s a bore. Clocking in at a sluggish one hour
    and fifty one minutes, I constantly was asking myself if this film
    might have been improved if they replaced all the supporting characters
    with mannequins. Perhaps if Graham Chapman’s ghost popped up and sung
    ”Always Look on the Bright Side of Life” there’d be signs of actual,
    you know, life.

    The film starts with the young Jesus (Greaves-Neal) living in
    Alexandria with his parents Joseph (Walsh), Mary (Lazzaro) and their
    extended family. After drawn-out moments of pensive staring and one
    half-hearted occasion of necromancy, the family decides to trek back to
    Judiah since the infamous King Herod is dead. Then the family walks,
    and walks, and walks until finally they don’t. They stop in Nazareth,
    then Jerusalem slowly realizing that their movements are being
    monitored by Severus (Bean), a Roman centurion tasked with finding a
    certain seven-year-old with a knack for miracles.

    The main source of attempted tension comes from Severus and Herod Jr.
    (Bailey) trying to find the mythic child of Bethlehem. The film takes
    great pains in making Herod as traditionally evil as possible complete
    with effeminate, overly dramatic mannerisms, a testy anger and an
    almost stunning lack of awareness. Sean Bean fairs a little better as
    Severus by simply phoning it in as the bad guy with a complicated past.
    Yet even his jaded, near expressionless presence can’t make the film
    exciting. The moments of ”chase” are largely missed connections with
    supporting characters pointing north and saying ”he went that a- way.”
    Meanwhile Severus prattles on about Roman steel. We all know the story
    of Jesus, or at least we know enough to assume he’s not captured by
    Romans at seven-years-old so why is this dull chase the centerpiece of
    this dribble? At no point in time will a reasonable viewer think Jesus
    is in any real harm so why the cloak and daggers BS?

    The secondary source of tension comes from Joseph’s unwillingness to
    speak to Jesus about his origins because of…reasons. What those
    reasons are, we’re never made privy to. Half-realized conversations
    happen with such regularity that one would be hard-pressed to find
    anyone’s reasons for doing anything in this movie. Jesus on the other
    hand seems to take things in stride, performing miracles, showing off
    in front of rabbis and otherwise being the embodiment of Christ in
    miniature form. That’s great and all, but he’s not exactly an
    interesting character. Instead he’s every ”the one,” ”the special,” the
    superhero Metropolis needs,” we’ve seen thousands of times before. I
    understand Jesus’s tale is the granddaddy of all heroes journeys but
    this film approaches the source material with such a pitiful lack of
    imagination that Jesus doesn’t feel like a messiah but an X-Man.

    With a subject so revered by countless believers, I’m surprised just
    how painfully conventional Young Messiah is. The film is adapted from
    ”Christ the Lord: Out of Egypt” written by Anne Rice who injects
    religious iconography into all her books with such regularity, that I’m
    surprised she’s not a nun by now. Brought to moribund life by director
    Cyrus Nowrasteh, the cinematography and editing is film-school, senior
    thesis level atypical. There are some moments approaching the ethereal
    in the vein of music video expressionism, but then we’re brought right
    back into the heavy- handed pandering that’s become a hallmark of these
    kinds of movies.

    The best thing that can be said about Young Messiah is at least it
    panders without fear-mongering or demonizing other groups. Movies like
    God’s Not Dead (2014) and Left Behind (2014) preach with such bluster,
    that the only thing stopping them from being malignantly harmful is
    their amateurishness. I long for the day when we expect more from these
    kinds of movies other than them being benignly boring. It is possible,
    if you’re willing to sit through rarefied gems like The Tree of Life
    (2011) or Au Hasard Balthazar (1966) or The Passion of Joan of Arc
    (1928). Otherwise you may just have to get your spiritual fulfillment
    watching your nephew’s nativity play.

  • GREG MISIEWICZMarch 13, 2016Reply

    Jesus had to learn who he really was. It could be very true.

    It is a bold attempt to write a screenplay about young Messiah’s life
    and turn it into movie since we have no canonical sources (perhaps it
    is so for a reason) apart from one clear episode in the Gospel. And the
    authors should be congratulated for this attempt (perhaps it is first
    one). For today’s audience the movie would appear rather emotionally
    flat. And there is no special effects, not unexpected and shocking
    turns along the way. But it has good side too. It shows that the life
    of young Messiah probably was simple and very human. It shows that
    Jesus had to learn who he really was and his earthly parents had to
    help him to find it out. It could be very true.

  • daveyboygeeMarch 13, 2016Reply

    Amazing Young Messiah

    So, a movie about a boy who is learning to use his superpowers as he
    grows into a man that will be able to save thousands of innocent people
    in a single bound. You might think I’m talking about Superman. I’m
    actually talking about ”Young Messiah.” There’s probably not a more
    difficult subject to undertake than a film about Jesus that doesn’t
    rewrite scripture. So when writing about his boyhood, which occupies a
    mere 12 versus of the Bible, it compounds the difficulty of this task
    by a hundredfold. I mean, how do you represent a child who does no
    wrong? Who is completely perfect? What would that even look like? God
    only knows! But because of the high degree of difficulty it must have
    taken, I give the makers of this movie huge credit for the way they
    were able to pull off this picture. The characters were well cast, the
    dialogue was sharp, there were action scenes that were well-developed
    and the violence of Crucifixions and necessary bawdiness of a depraved
    king’s court went far enough to tell the story but not become a
    distraction.

    This movie must be seen to be appreciated. There are some scenes that
    are particularly moving: the blind teacher in the temple, the threats
    of Satan and the village Rabbi stand out. Many of them have to do with
    the way the boy Jesus interacts with his elders. I was moved to tears
    of appreciation in several spots. Like any epic story, it enriches the
    experience to be immersed in the subject matter.A familiarity with the
    Bible and the foreshadowing of events to come just makes it better. One
    big draw to the casting was the child actor who played Jesus. He was
    confident yet respectful and kind. He portrayed the boy Jesus well.
    There was an appeal, I felt, to the fact that he and many of the cast
    spoke with a British accent.

    I’ve read a review or two that said that knowing that Jesus will live
    to adulthood spoils the tension. OK, when you watched Avengers or Star
    Wars or any such epic tale did you really think any of the main
    characters would die? Did that take the mystery out of the movie? Of
    course not! The same is true here. The antagonist form of Satan is
    perfectly scary. King Herrod’s commands to the centurion make it seem
    like Jesus could be found and killed at any moment.

    The movie was excellent but there were small distractions resulting
    from rushed filming and places where I thought that scenes and dialogue
    could have been better developed. These are limited and I will let you
    decide for yourself where they might be. Still, I give this movie a
    solid 9 stars and I listed it as 10 here because it got such mixed
    reviews but it deserves better. Go see Young Messiah. It is a great
    movie experience not to be missed!

  • Dave McClain ([email protected])March 13, 2016Reply

    ”The Young Messiah” is very original and surprisingly entertaining.

    ”Jesus, who is called the Christ,” as the Bible refers to him, is
    likely the most famous person who has ever walked the earth, but
    surprisingly little has been written about his formative years. Stories
    about his conception and birth, his three-year-long ministry, and the
    circumstances surrounding and immediately following his death have been
    told, re-told, written about, interpreted, edited, translated,
    discussed and argued about for over two millennia, but those stories
    account for only about 10% of the time Jesus spent on earth. What of
    the other 90%? It’s interesting to speculate. Of course, part of that
    speculation would have to include the question of what Jesus was like
    as a child. That’s the speculation into which ”Interview with the
    Vampire” author Anne Rice delved in her 2005 historical fiction novel
    ”Christ the Lord: Out of Egypt”, which led to the 2016 feature film
    ”The Young Messiah” (PG-13, 1:51).

    Jesus (as played by Adam Greaves-Neal) is shown to be the most
    extraordinary ordinary seven-year-old boy who ever lived. Such are the
    contradictory but co-existing natures of the Jesus of Christianity –
    simultaneously both human and divine, or, as the Bible calls him,
    Immanuel, meaning ”God with us”. The child Jesus loves to run and laugh
    and play, but he can also be very serious – displaying an inquisitive
    nature – and showing deep concern when he observes suffering and death.
    While playing on the sea shore, he sees a dead bird lying in the sand.
    He picks up the bird, holds it in his hands for a moment, and then the
    bird flies away. Incidents like this naturally lead Jesus to ask his
    mother, Mary (Sara Lazzaro), why he can do things other children
    cannot. Mary and Joseph (Vincent Walsh) agree that Jesus is too young
    to understand who he is – and they’re not sure that they can even
    explain it to him.

    While the duality of Jesus’ nature is a central theme throughout this
    film, the plot revolves around something else entirely. As the movie
    opens, Jesus and his family are living in Egypt – where the Bible says
    Joseph took his family when Jesus was an infant in order to save him
    from King Herod’s order to murder all baby boys in Judea (in case the
    rumors of the birth of a Jewish messiah were true). Now, seven years
    later, Joseph says he has been told in a dream that Herod is dead and
    it’s time to take his family back to their homeland. The journey is a
    long and dangerous one – through areas in which Roman soldiers fight,
    kill and sometimes crucify rebels and others that they consider a
    threat to Roman rule. But the greatest dangers are those that the
    family doesn’t yet know are there – a Roman centurion (Sean Bean) and
    his men who are under orders from the new king (Jonathan Bailey) to
    find and kill the Jewish boy who is rumored to be performing miracles
    among the people – and a demon (Rory Keenan) who repeatedly puts Jesus
    in danger and appears to him in a dream demanding to know who he really
    is.

    ”The Young Messiah” is one of the best – and most original movies about
    Jesus I’ve ever seen. Anne Rice’s story, as adapted for the screen by
    director Cyrus Nowrasteh and his wife Betsy Giffen Nowrasteh mostly
    sticks within the framework of what the Bible has to say about Jesus’
    childhood – and his character as a person. (This film shows Jesus
    performing miracles even though the Bible says that his first miracle
    was as an adult. However, the few miracles we see the child Jesus
    performing are in front of relatively small groups of people, so his
    first adult miracle could be understood to be his first public miracle
    – the one that was meant to be seen as the beginning of his adult
    ministry… or not. It’s up to you.) The film is interesting,
    historically realistic (or ”mostly” realistic, depending on whether you
    believe in miracles) and contains drama, action, surprises and tender,
    heartfelt moments. The performances are all strong (especially from
    Greaves-Neal) and the conversations and interactions feel authentic and
    very human. ”The Young Messiah” is a well-produced and surprisingly
    entertaining film. ”A”

  • SpiritMechanicMarch 13, 2016Reply

    Tries too hard

    *** This review may contain spoilers ***

  • Dave McClain ([email protected])March 14, 2016Reply

    ”The Young Messiah” is very original and surprisingly entertaining.

    ”Jesus, who is called the Christ,” as the Bible refers to him, is
    likely the most famous person who has ever walked the earth, but
    surprisingly little has been written about his formative years. Stories
    about his conception and birth, his three-year-long ministry, and the
    circumstances surrounding and immediately following his death have been
    told, re-told, written about, interpreted, edited, translated,
    discussed and argued about for over two millennia, but those stories
    account for only about 10% of the time Jesus spent on earth. What of
    the other 90%? It’s interesting to speculate. Of course, part of that
    speculation would have to include the question of what Jesus was like
    as a child. That’s the speculation into which ”Interview with the
    Vampire” author Anne Rice delved in her 2005 historical fiction novel
    ”Christ the Lord: Out of Egypt”, which led to the 2016 feature film
    ”The Young Messiah” (PG-13, 1:51).

    Jesus (as played by Adam Greaves-Neal) is shown to be the most
    extraordinary ordinary seven-year-old boy who ever lived. Such are the
    contradictory but co-existing natures of the Jesus of Christianity –
    simultaneously both human and divine, or, as the Bible calls him,
    Immanuel, meaning ”God with us”. The child Jesus loves to run and laugh
    and play, but he can also be very serious – displaying an inquisitive
    nature – and showing deep concern when he observes suffering and death.
    While playing on the sea shore, he sees a dead bird lying in the sand.
    He picks up the bird, holds it in his hands for a moment, and then the
    bird flies away. Incidents like this naturally lead Jesus to ask his
    mother, Mary (Sara Lazzaro), why he can do things other children
    cannot. Mary and Joseph (Vincent Walsh) agree that Jesus is too young
    to understand who he is – and they’re not sure that they can even
    explain it to him.

    While the duality of Jesus’ nature is a central theme throughout this
    film, the plot revolves around something else entirely. As the movie
    opens, Jesus and his family are living in Egypt – where the Bible says
    Joseph took his family when Jesus was an infant in order to save him
    from King Herod’s order to murder all baby boys in Judea (in case the
    rumors of the birth of a Jewish messiah were true). Now, seven years
    later, Joseph says he has been told in a dream that Herod is dead and
    it’s time to take his family back to their homeland. The journey is a
    long and dangerous one – through areas in which Roman soldiers fight,
    kill and sometimes crucify rebels and others that they consider a
    threat to Roman rule. But the greatest dangers are those that the
    family doesn’t yet know are there – a Roman centurion (Sean Bean) and
    his men who are under orders from the new king (Jonathan Bailey) to
    find and kill the Jewish boy who is rumored to be performing miracles
    among the people – and a demon (Rory Keenan) who repeatedly puts Jesus
    in danger and appears to him in a dream demanding to know who he really
    is.

    ”The Young Messiah” is one of the best – and most original movies about
    Jesus I’ve ever seen. Anne Rice’s story, as adapted for the screen by
    director Cyrus Nowrasteh and his wife Betsy Giffen Nowrasteh mostly
    sticks within the framework of what the Bible has to say about Jesus’
    childhood – and his character as a person. (This film shows Jesus
    performing miracles even though the Bible says that his first miracle
    was as an adult. However, the few miracles we see the child Jesus
    performing are in front of relatively small groups of people, so his
    first adult miracle could be understood to be his first public miracle
    – the one that was meant to be seen as the beginning of his adult
    ministry… or not. It’s up to you.) The film is interesting,
    historically realistic (or ”mostly” realistic, depending on whether you
    believe in miracles) and contains drama, action, surprises and tender,
    heartfelt moments. The performances are all strong (especially from
    Greaves-Neal) and the conversations and interactions feel authentic and
    very human. ”The Young Messiah” is a well-produced and surprisingly
    entertaining film. ”A”

  • Vlad_ImirivanMarch 14, 2016Reply

    Excellently loving interpretation

    This engaging dramatization remains faithful to the underlying message
    of scripture even as it speculates about the childhood of Jesus (played
    here, age 7, a topic on which the Gospels are virtually silent. As
    Joseph leads his family back from exile in Egypt, he and Mary struggle
    to understand and guide their unique son, whose supernatural identity
    is at least partially known to his relatives — including his uncle
    Cleopas and cousin James — and whose miraculous powers are already
    apparent. Danger pursues the extended clan in the person of a Roman
    centurion who has orders from King Herod (Jonathan Bailey) to find and
    kill the boy and in the figure of Satan whose presence only Jesus can
    sense. The director’s interpretation to Anne Rice’s 2005 novel ”Christ
    the Lord: Out of Egypt” sensitively explores the mystery of the
    Incarnation in a way that will both intrigue and entertain viewers of
    most ages. in short .. the story ”Rocks”

  • Edgar Allan PoohMarch 14, 2016Reply

    Comcast’s THE YOUNG MESSIAH is far more dangerous to Fundamentalist Believers . . .

    *** This review may contain spoilers ***

  • Dianne Hanks La CourMarch 14, 2016Reply

    A Glimpse of Possibilities

    ”The Young Messiah” Review, One Woman’s Opinion. I recommend seeing it,
    though on my Boo Hoo Meter, it doesn’t even rate, for not a single tear
    spilled from my eyes, it wasn’t that kind of film. It actually was
    quite a bit scarier than I would have imagined, especially when the
    evil Satan-like character, who not everyone can see or hear is on
    screen.

    I’m delighted to see a plethora of faith-promoting cinema, and I think
    that’s because so many of us believers are grasping onto whatever
    shreds of hope that still remain in our dark and dreary world, not to
    mention the financial success marketing to a faithful populace who
    thirsts and hungers for something worthy, something uplifting,
    something not vile, vulgar, gratuitous, or profane. For that reason
    alone, it’s worth supporting.

    To be shared a glimpse of what it might have been like to observe
    Christ from a different perspective than believers currently have has
    enough merit to provoke further questioning, which may motivate
    believers and non-believers alike to plunge yet again into the familiar
    text of the Holy Bible for what IS provided as scripture and sanctioned
    for distribution to the saints and the world at large, and that is
    always a good thing.

    Additionally, I can’t help myself in observing all the costumes, sets,
    casting, accents, props, behaviors, and such, because in a movie, it
    takes just seconds to see what the book may take pages and pages to
    describe in setting the period with complete authenticity. This movie
    eventually won me over in creating a period of time that was utterly
    believable with one exception, English accents from Britain. Uh, who
    said the Christ child had an English accent, hello? So, give this
    aspect a pass and enjoy the rest of what’s good about this movie,
    because there is a lot to appreciate, despite that.

    The physical setting of the film is positively perfect. It’s just
    breathtaking as to how I imagine the accuracy of the day was. It’s
    filmed in Italy, which I guessed when the credits rolled at the end
    before it said exactly where. Most of the credits are of local people
    who, naturally, have perfectly Italian last names. I didn’t see one
    evidence of modern-day influence or slip-up, which is saying something.
    Whoever was in charge of that deserves some kind of award for
    transporting the viewer to 7 A. D. with no ripples! I really REALLY
    liked the character, Sarah, the old woman, who surprised and blessed
    the offending soldiers with food and wine and implored them to spare
    her family, which was just a brilliant strategy. I have no doubt such
    women existed and still exist to soften hearts of hardened men. Her
    weather-beaten look and those of other extras lent to the rawness of
    the time and harshness of the conditions of that day. They were just
    great. No sunscreen or night cream regimen for them. No pinking of
    their lips, no lip balm, and no blush on their cheeks.

    Other scenes along their path were sad to see, including the process of
    hoisting criminals up on crosses. The murdering of all the little boys
    was also depicted with splatters of blood and shadows, which gave me
    pause as to whether it would be appropriate for sensitive young
    viewers, it was pretty intense and scary.

    The other scary role mentioned above was the demon I previously
    mentioned. He was quite deliciously frightening. His whispers to people
    who couldn’t see him are something I believe is possible in our unseen
    but still real world. It was interesting that Jesus could see him,
    could hear him, but was unafraid of him in the least. It was also
    interesting that the demon didn’t know who Jesus was, only that he was
    an ”angel” boy and wanted to thwart his good deeds and influence others
    to do the same.

    The fact that the film portrayed Christ performing miracles but still
    didn’t know who He was or why He could was reminiscent of Harry Potter,
    who performed magic as a boy long before he knew he was a wizard. In
    reality, I prefer to think His mother Mary and Joseph, along with His
    Father in Heaven let Him know who He was, but I was not upset in any
    way how this portrayal was presented. We simply don’t know, and that’s
    the fun of this picture. It attempts to fill in the gaps the scriptures
    leave.

    The caution would be to be sure to teach children that this is a work
    of pure fiction, because of the phenomenon uninformed viewers have of
    just believing things simply because they are shown in a film, another
    reason I detest the new ”Noah”, written with a wicked, intentional,
    history-revisionist’s hand. I refuse to support such deplorable
    ambitions to distort, marginalize, and destroy real history through
    political agenda-driven films. This movie is not that. It’s simply a
    suggestion of what may have happened. It offered me a little insight as
    to the reality of how dangerous it was for him, always being hunted.
    Joseph and Mary’s characters were totally believable. Joseph is a stud
    for who he was and what he had to take on. Think of it, the scandal! I
    would have liked to see more of Joseph teaching Jesus how to be a
    carpenter, how they interacted while not being pursued.

    As you can see, there is enough worth supporting about this film. I
    can’t think of a reason to trash a film that attempts to promote faith,
    unless you’re a faith hater. I just don’t get that. Intent matters, and
    while making money is important to the solvency of a project, I don’t
    believe that is the reason behind why this creative team put this out,
    not in the least. People who make films like these are part of the
    solution, not part of the problem, and God bless them for that!

  • rmay17March 14, 2016Reply

    A Real Winner

    Absent any strong evidence, no one can say when our young Messiah was
    informed (or by whom) that He was the Son of God. Approach this film
    with that knowledge and you will love it.

    I think the film was extremely well-done and Sean Bean as the
    relentless Centurion charged with killing the young Messiah was
    outstanding. Period. The script was very believable and Jesus was
    neither over-played nor under-played. As a Christian, I found myself in
    tears through much of the movie… sometimes happy ones and some that
    were evoked in thoughts of how young Jesus and His family had to have
    suffered.

    My wife and I both feel that faith-based films are being more widely
    received by the general public and as a result, story lines are
    improved, directing is much better, and the quality of actors is very
    much better. Hollywood seems to finally be getting the message.

  • blackbolt-97569March 15, 2016Reply

    Great dialogue, scenery

    The movie had a great interaction between the cast. A developing story
    line and entertaining characters. Almost every and any Christian could
    find fault with historical facts/figures presented as part of typical
    nitpicking. Based upon our exposure and experience to not only the
    bible but other historical sources. Thankfully the story was not about
    historical accuracy but about a young Jesus, and a very good story at
    that. It is based upon the creative hypothetical. What would it be like
    to be Jesus growing up? Concentrating on a short span of time but
    including Jesus’s trip to Jerusalem for Passover when he is just 7
    years of age. I found it thoughtful, illuminating and satisfying. I am
    sure many will too. Go see it ye Christian soldiers.

  • veemail23March 17, 2016Reply

    Thoughtfully compelling

    Despite some literary license taken with the Bible, the movie still
    offers great food for thought for considering what Jesus’s
    developmental days might have been like…for Jesus and for all
    concerned in his presence.

    The acting is superb (far better than ”Risen”) with a beautiful
    Biblical backdrop. The director focuses often on facial close-ups and
    the actors respond with looks that offer more than words might
    describe.

    Sara Lazaro is perfect as Mary. Sean Bean outstanding as Severus. Adam
    Greaves-Neal carefully crafts a compelling young Jesus.

    Bible readers know Jesus’ first recorded miracle didn’t happen till
    much later and the Wise Men didn’t appear right at Jesus’ birth, but
    putting that aside (and the slip-on sandals…I don’t think those were
    that popular then) the movie explores some complexities that might not
    always be considered when thinking of a young Jesus and overall
    succeeds in doing it in an uplifting, yet not hokey manner.

  • dutchs-1March 18, 2016Reply

    Starts out Aimless, Gets a Bit Better

    *** This review may contain spoilers ***

  • topekaMarch 19, 2016Reply

    Fun flick – fiction about JC

    *** This review may contain spoilers ***

  • Hot 888 MamaMarch 20, 2016Reply

    I thought that I was going to a Bible film but . . .

    *** This review may contain spoilers ***

  • cultfilmfanMarch 21, 2016Reply

    The Young Messiah

    On seeing the new film, The Young Messiah about Jesus’s life as a
    child, there is a couple of things that I had to keep in mind before I
    saw the film and afterwards too. I think these same points will be
    helpful for those who go to see the film as well. First off being the
    fact that in the four gospel accounts of Christ’s life, there is really
    not too much mentioned about his childhood. Most of the information
    that the Bible gives us about his early life is related to his birth
    and the nativity story which most Christians, or people in general will
    know fairly well especially around Christmastime. The other events of
    his early life such as we read about how Mary and Joseph bring the
    child to Jerusalem, to present him to God, and we read that in
    Jerusalem there was a man named Simeon, who was just and devout and who
    was waiting for the consolation of Israel and he had the Holy Spirit
    upon him. After having a revelation about him not seeing his own death
    before he saw the Lord’s Christ, he blessed the infant Jesus and also
    told Mary that this child would be the fall and rising of many in
    Israel and even knew then how Jesus would eventually die and suffer for
    sins (although Mary and Joseph perhaps did not understand that at the
    time). This was all as he was still an infant and the only account of
    him being of advanced age is when Mary and Joseph accidentally leave
    him behind at the temple and the many teachers and rulers of the law
    were astounded by his knowledge and understanding of the scriptures.
    That was when he was twelve years old and that is as young as we get,
    or the only instant of him as a child growing up other than being an
    infant (you may also want to consider the nativity story itself as well
    as Anna the prophetess being in a similar situation as Simeon and being
    completely overjoyed by his birth). That is more, or less what the
    Bible and the gospels tell of his infancy and childhood. Another thing
    to keep in mind is that The Young Messiah, is based upon a novel by
    Anne Rice. This is the same Anne Rice, who gave us Interview with the
    Vampire and Exit to Eden, so we know she has a creative imagination,
    but could she give us a Biblically inspired film that for the most part
    would take a great deal of creative liberty because of the facts stated
    above that we really do not have that information present to us. Could
    she successfully translate and make a story and now a film about it?
    The answer is a surprising yes, but when I say that you have to keep a
    couple of things in mind. The film takes a lot of liberties and there
    is probably more in this film that is unBiblical as opposed to true.
    Also the Catholic doctrine plays heavily into this film and if you are
    from another denomination your views, or opinions of the film will tend
    to be in jeopardy perhaps. There is also crucial things such as most of
    the actors do not look like they come from Jerusalem, or are from that
    part of the world and also many of these actors seem to speak with a
    British accent which will not win everybody over either. The film as it
    stands is more of a thought provoking piece and more, or less an
    interesting piece of fiction for the most part that takes well known
    beliefs and events and puts an author’s creative spin on it. For the
    most part the film manages to make you look at things in other ways
    (which sometimes may be good and bad), but also manages to entertain
    and move you at the same time. This will probably not go down as one of
    the best Biblical films ever made, but for what it is, it is generally
    well made and I think that the film does force you to confront what you
    believe and generally embrace your beliefs which is a strong point to
    the film and while I do not think that it is the type of film to
    convert any unbelievers, I do feel that it will have you thinking and
    generally it is a moving if altogether pleasant film that is probably a
    lot better than you would anticipate, but at the same time not an
    accurate film that you would show to your Bible study group either.

  • jhboswellMarch 22, 2016Reply

    Unpretentious, plausible, well made, slightly flawed

    First of all, it’s been great to see a spate of movies about Jesus
    Christ, the carpenter from Nazareth, Who has been proved to be the Son
    of God Almighty. As one of his great followers said, it only matters
    that, in every way, Christ is proclaimed, including on the silver
    screen.

    Next, and with no apologies for the brief Christian message above, this
    movie is a worthy addition to the others out there. I’m happy to see
    some filmmakers’ ideas about Jesus as a boy, incorporating Bibilical
    stories into their own; I believe it can add to our understanding in
    the same way a good Sunday sermon can do. This film was very well made:
    the production, the acting, the editing all commendably done.

    Finally, we enjoyed this nice movie very much! Thanks a lot.

  • quincytheodoreApril 4, 2016Reply

    A nice perspective on Messiah tale, though lighter on impact and narrative

    The story of Jesus’ childhood may not be particularly well known
    compared to his more grand birth or ascension, although it does have a
    few appealing aspects. ”The Young Messiah” tries to showcase the burden
    of destiny through the eyes of a child. It’s not an extravagant story,
    but a more humble one with small production.

    Most of the focus rests on Adam Greaves-Neal who plays the young Jesus,
    it’s a lot to expect from a child actor. He performs on few better
    occasions, even though not every sequence can convey the weight. Still,
    the movie’s hook is about innocence, and for that effect the simple
    casting might just work.

    Sean Bean plays as a Centurion who works for Herod, the king who is
    afraid he will be dethroned by prophesied messiah. Sean Bean has done
    so many of similar roles, he looks like he is in the right era. There’s
    also slight inclusion of heavy subject but it’s well in the realm of
    family viewing.

    Cinematography works in the scale it’s designated in. The movie mainly
    transpires in small villages or medium sized town, which keeps the
    visual manageable. Along with the humor and mild theme, this is an
    accessible take on the famous life. It won’t provide much philosophical
    content although it would be a decent family friendly drama.

  • phd_travelApril 6, 2016Reply

    Entertaining

    Don’t think there has been a movie about Jesus as a little boy so this
    is an interesting and entertaining movie about Jesus around 7 years old
    leaving Egypt and returning to Nazareth and Jerusalem. It’s done in
    quite an exciting way with a constant sense of danger as the evil King
    Herod dispatches Roman soldiers to kill Jesus. The scenery looks good
    and there are several miracles along the way.

    The young actor who plays Jesus, Adam Greaves Neal is certainly
    cherubic / angelic. He delivers his lines clearly with a very strong
    British accent. The actress who plays Mary is suited to the role and
    looks very much an image of Mary. Sean Bean is a little British Isles
    to be a Roman. Herod seemed a bit slimy.

    Worth a watch. Makes you want to learn more about the early life of
    Jesus.

  • bja-58212May 5, 2016Reply

    A wonderful movie about the message of redemption

    *** This review may contain spoilers ***

  • mailadobeJune 3, 2016Reply

    To be honest with you, Jesus looks in this movie as a young girl

    To be honest with you, Jesus looks in this movie as a young girl which
    is pro-fanatic vision of himself as a Messiah of the human race. I do
    not think that it needs more comment than that the previous movie
    titled A child Called Jesus, lead the young actor who played a young
    Jesus, to play in the future in the movie related to two homosexual
    gays titled ”Barocco” and to finally leave acting forever. This movie
    to me is just another disaster and the never ending story of the man
    who died 2000 years ago, leaving us alone, should be forgotten. Why to
    show Jesus as this child. Show him as the child that is handicapped on
    the wheelchair, maybe as a blind child. There are so many of them who
    need help. And then where is the Jesus for them to to help them? It is
    another fairy tale that makes a total mess up in the mind of a growing
    up child that plays this role.

  • KirpianuscusJune 21, 2016Reply

    game with Gnostic texts

    first – a bizarre film. for the not inspired cast, for the large isles
    of non sense, for the absence of precise purpose. it is not a Christian
    film and not a religious one. only a strange embroidery of fragments
    from the Gnostic Gospels, few good actors in uncomfortable roles and a
    chaotic story. the dialogues, the acting, the generous message – all is
    fake or wrong or almost blasphemy. result – a kind of surrogate. the
    young Adam Greaves – Neal is far to be the perfect choice for a role
    who represents only source of confusion. Sara Lazzaro must be a second
    Olivia Hussley from the Jesus of Zeffireli. but her role remains a
    sketch. Jonathan Bailey gives a barefooted Herod without any precise
    purpose because his status is only as decoration. Sean Bean, the poor
    Sean Bean… Jane Lapotaire does her the best try but the old Sarah is
    impossible to be credible as result of confuse script. the Bible is
    ignored and the Gnostic texts as used only as pretext. the result – a
    film with interesting idea about nothing. or only an exercise of
    blasphemy.

  • Jordana WalshJune 27, 2016Reply

    Beautufully made and acted movie

    I am usually not a fan of too many Christian movies because of the
    often cringe-worthy acting, directing, overly obvious and predictable
    story lines (obviously not applicable to historical movies), etc.
    However, this movie, from the acting, to the cinematography and story
    line was absolutely riveting and simply beautiful. I highly recommend
    it. I usually do not write reviews, but I was so moved by this movie
    that I felt it was appropriate to do so. I plan to buy the DVD because
    I loved this film so much, I want to own it. It’s now one of my top
    movies along with Funny Face, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, Quo Vadis, The
    Greatest Story Ever told, and the Passion. I felt it was a much
    stronger and much better film than Risen, which struggled, in my
    opinion, in the story line even with such talented cast. The young
    Messiah is a fabulous movie, the casting was perfect and the actor that
    played Jesus was excellent. The film does a great job of portraying how
    Christ as fully human and fully God, ”continued to grow and become
    strong, increasing in wisdom; and the grace of God was upon him”. Luke
    2:40. I felt the marketing for this movie felt short, maybe due to
    budget constraints, but I did not see as much of it on social media, or
    even advertisements. I hope it makes enough on DVD sales because I
    would like to see more movies like it. I hope this review is helpful
    and wish everyone a wonderful week!

  • ipcress35July 8, 2016Reply

    Brilliant Film

    Having thought this may have been on the boring side I was quite
    surprised to find myself absolutely glued to it from start to finish.
    It was wonderful to watch. I thought the cast played their roles
    extremely well and the film was well thought out. I think many
    religious films get slated by critics because many believe that in the
    21st century religion isn’t as important to some as it was years ago. I
    think Adam Greaves-Neal played the role really well. Not wanting to
    annoy any Americans reading this but it was fresh to hear an innocent
    English speaking accent in a film such as this. I thought the music was
    beautiful too and captured the scenes really well. This was refreshing
    to watch and at times I had watery eyes too but this is a feel good
    film and it is definitely worth watching.

  • lavatchJuly 19, 2016Reply

    The Education of Jesus bar Joseph

    *** This review may contain spoilers ***

  • QueerVamp20July 26, 2016Reply

    A glimpse into the eyes of Innocent Love!!!

    Take a breathtaking journey into a year in the life of ”The Young
    Messiah”. What was Jesus like as a kid? How do you explain what He went
    through to become who He is and was? Miracles are in this movie – A
    question-asking young boy who truly didn’t know the power He would
    later use to save the souls of the Earth. Jesus is played by a
    beautiful young boy who is very good in his role. With his parents
    (Mary and Joseph), they flee the town they are in. On their journey,
    young Jesus begins to learn and do things He doesn’t quite understand
    at first – Jesus as a child is so amazing because even with my being a
    Christian, it didn’t make me look at Jesus any different than I do now
    (with respect and love) – Forgiveness was yet to be known – but Jesus
    was more than a forgiver, even as a child – Watch what happens and go
    see the movie – It’s worth a watch.

  • Bob RutzelAugust 13, 2016Reply

    Very enjoyable

    Jesus (Adam Greaves-Neal), Mary (Sara Lazzaro) and Joseph (Vincent
    Walsh) had fled from Bethlehem to Egypt to avoid King Herod’s decree of
    killing every male baby hoping to kill Jesus, a rival that threatened
    him. When they learn of King Herod’s death, the family returns home to
    Nazareth only to become aware that Herod’s son (Jonathan Bailey) is
    after the same thing as his father. Jesus at 7-years of age is aware
    that his family is keeping secrets from him.

    The birth of Jesus, the finding of Jesus in the Temple by Mary, and the
    wedding in Canaan are the three events we are most familiar with until
    Jesus begins his ministry at 30-years of age. In this story we see that
    Jesus doesn’t really know who he is. He can do things like perform
    miracles, but doesn’t know why he can do these things. He asks many
    questions and eventually Mary tells him of his birth and who he really
    is and that he must hide his powers until God tells him when he can use
    them.

    We see Roman Centurion Severus (Sean Bean) ordered by Herod to find and
    kill Jesus and this takes up most of the movie. And yes, they do meet
    for a second time. (A second time???)

    We also see The Demon (Rory Keenan) following Jesus as he is not sure
    who Jesus is. Jesus is the only one who can see and hear The Demon.

    This is not a Christian exposé, so to speak, so we do not get a lot of
    Christianity and benefits thereof. But no worries as this Is not a
    revival. (Thank you)

    This is a story made up by Anne Rice – the Vampire authoress – about a
    boy learning who he is and the family and friends protecting him from
    harm.

    However, if those of you who have read the Valtorta books you know
    Jesus knew who he was from the very start. Be that as it may, this is a
    refreshing look into ”maybe it was like this.” Everything was
    constructive and nothing was destructive and it’s a very enjoyable
    story.

    You can almost believe that Jesus may have looked like and behaved as
    we see Adam Greaves-Neal behave in this story. And that’s a nice touch.

    This is a well presented production and the acting all around is very
    good. (7/10)

    Violence: Yes, some not much. Sex: No. Nudity: No. Language: No.

  • merrillmountAugust 26, 2016Reply

    Did they forget to read the actual Bible

    There are so many things wrong with this movie. I am fine that they
    wanted to make a speculative movie about Jesus as a youth, but at least
    use the facts we do know. Let’s start with the fact that they have him
    meet the Wise Men as a babe. He was close to 2 years old when they
    arrive. Also Joseph and Mary had left prior to the children being
    killed. Then the reason they leave Egypt since they are told it is
    safe. Ummmm, this movie is all about it not being safe. Then they have
    him going to the temple at age 7, he was 12. And why do they always
    have Jesus not knowing who he is? I am pretty certain Joseph and Mary
    told Christ who He was from the earliest days. And even if they didn’t
    He would know since He is the Son of God. Yes everyone knows the secret
    that He is God except Him. I don’t buy it. About the only thing they
    got correct was I am sure Satan tried to tempt him. Serious Train
    Wreck!

  • mmpatriotDecember 13, 2016Reply

    A magnificent story. So beautiful

    I just watched this movie. So beautiful and so sweet. It should be
    getting straight 10’s all across the board. I am a Traditional Catholic
    and I was not ”offended” like some of you pretend to be. This was a
    sweet story that tried to give us an idea of what Jesus’ life might
    have been like as a child. The music was so wonderful. I loved this
    film. So well done and the actors were perfect for the roles they
    played. I recommend this to EVERYONE. Maybe you’ll learn something
    about humility. I could see this movie many times, just happens to be
    Christmas time that I was able to see it and I couldn’t have planned it
    better. Please see this movie, it is so wonderful!!!

  • AspegicFebruary 24, 2017Reply

    Booooooring. Nuf said.

    Boring movie. Bad script. Bad casting (with the exception of Sean
    Bean). Slow pace would be an overstatement. Halfway through the movie I
    found myself rooting for the Romans. The only amazing thing about this
    movie is that they were able to make a trailer out of it that made me
    want to watch it. Hats of to the maker of the trailer. As for the
    rest… next please.

  • xlg_mediumMarch 3, 2017Reply

    False Narrative

    This movie depicts Christians as crazy, drunk and psychopaths. It’s a
    perfect Obama film. Take all the credit and none of the blame until it
    suits their cause , be the marder . In the the Quran it says it’s OK to
    lie to the infidel to gain their trust and put you into strength. Read
    between the lines.

  • jonplyMarch 4, 2017Reply

    Not based on verified evidence

    It wasn’t until seeing the credits that I found this is based on an
    Anne Rice (Interview With The Vampire) novel of the same name. Had I
    know that, I would not have seen it before reading the reviews.

    Information is collected from sources that have no secular evidence in
    antiquity, and much of the information is over dramatized by the
    writer. Granted, the Bible does not disclose the Savior’s life around
    this period, but the referenced miracles are from the apocrypha
    documents that cannot be dated to the time of Christ (some of them
    being up to 300 years after the event).

    If you are looking for reasonable fiction, this film gets a 5 of 10
    vote. If you are looking for a faith-based or spiritual movie, as the
    name suggests, look elsewhere.

Leave a comment

Name *
Add a display name
Email *
Your email address will not be published
Website